Home > Exhibition > Content
Heat Exchanger Basics-- Plate heat exchangers
Jul 20, 2017

Heat exchangers are widely used in various plant processes to transfer energy without mixing the related substances. As integral parts of comfort and process heating and cooling applications, they perform efficiently and effortlessly for years. We would like to share a little knowledge about heat exchangers and how they operate and hope it could help their users apply these devices more appropriately and cost effectively.
Each of the major types of heat exchanger: shell&tube, spiral, and plate are described and discussed here. 
Plate heat exchangers
The plate heat exchanger consists of a series of thin, corrugated alloy plates, which are gasketed and compressed together inside a carbon steel frame. Once compressed, the plate pack forms an arrangement of parallel flow channels. The two fluids (hot and cold) flow countercurrent to each other in alternate channels. Each plate is fitted with a gasket to direct the flow, seal the unit, and prevent fluid intermixing. Plate heat exchangers are frequently found in a wide range of heating and cooling applications in the chemical, petrochemical, petroleum, pulp and paper, and pharmaceutical industries, as well as in many wastewater treatment applications.
The proper choice of gasket materials is important for the reliable operation of plate heat exchangers. For nearly 60 yr, these units have primarily used elastomer gaskets to seal the unit, direct the flow, and prevent fluid intermixing. Commonly used elastomers today are variations of three basic materials: nitrile, ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), and Viton. Nitrile is the most common and is suitable for fluids such as water, oils, and foodstuffs. EPDM is used for fluids such as water, steam, dilute acids, amines, and strong alkalines. Viton is the most expensive material and is typically used for aggressive fluids such as concentrated acids and some petroleum oils.