Home > Exhibition > Content
Heat Exchanger Basics-- Spiral heat exchangers
Jul 20, 2017

Heat exchangers are widely used in various plant processes to transfer energy without mixing the related substances. As integral parts of comfort and process heating and cooling applications, they perform efficiently and effortlessly for years. We would like to share a little knowledge about heat exchangers and how they operate and hope it could help their users apply these devices more appropriately and cost effectively.
Each of the major types of heat exchanger: shell&tube, spiral, and plate are described and discussed here. 
Spiral heat exchangers
A spiral heat exchanger is constructed by rolling two relatively long metal strips around a mandrel to form two concentric spiral channels. The channels are alternately welded on opposite ends to form a hot and cold channel. Welding the channels eliminates the potential for any cross-contamination of fluids and is analogous to a welded tube to tube-sheet joint in a shell-and-tube heat exchanger.
On one side, the hot fluid enters the center nozzle of the hot cover and flows in a spiral outward to a nozzle on a peripheral header. The cold fluid simultaneously enters a peripheral header and flows countercurrently to the hot fluid to the center nozzle on the cold side cover. Removable cover heads with full-face gaskets are used to seal the open end of the channels and prevent bypassing of a respective fluid from the peripheral header to the center nozzles. The heads are easily removed to allow access to all heat transfer surfaces.
The countercurrent monochannels give exceptionally high convective heat transfer coefficients due to the high turbulence and secondary flow effects (eddy currents and vortices). The monochannel also minimizes the potential for fouling to occur because any buildup in the channel results in an increase in local velocity at that point, an action that tends to flush the deposit away. When a spiral heat exchanger does require cleaning, all heat transfer surfaces are readily accessible by simple removing the heads.
Spiral heat exchangers are particularly effective for handling sludges, liquids in suspension including slurries, and a wide range of viscous fluids. Their design and fabrication make them well suited for controlling viscosity, a vital parameter when abrasive or corrosive fluids must be handled. The spiral heat exchanger is also used as a condenser and evaporator.